Monday, January 15, 2018

Treesees 2017 Review

This past year has been busy creating urban and trail bags! 


If you read any of my other posts, you will see that I have a love for cooking and creating a life using old ways and traditions. So, developing a small home business where I can use my homesteading skills came naturally to me. It all started when my husband and I go camping and hiking around the hill country where we live. We like to take day hikes and explore the areas that we camp in. Both of us are gatherers of rocks and unique findings that we stumble across.  I have always tried to incorporate my findings into cabochons for my jewelry or to work them into my leather work.

What we found, was that on our hikes we needed more of a gather's bag for our collections rather than a traditional day pack. I started to play with a few different patterns and found most didn't fit our need.
I then set out to create a few that we could use on our trips and for training with our dogs.  We have trained them to search and find us if  one of us should get separated from the other on the trail. Treat bags have become a handy tool while training the two.


I have had several people ask about, and request the bags and leashes that I make. This brought me to the decision to start selling them on Treesees.  Over the last few years I have increased my sells and have had requests for more of  a urban bag to carry cell phones and other essentials. This year I am advancing into more unique one of a kind items that are functional for daily use. I will post them as I make them. My new line will be stamped with my original stamp and numbered in the series of the item. This is to insure that you have a specialty item made exclusively by me, Treesees.

Besides my love for cooking and living a small homestead life on the hill, this new outlet has allowed me to use my creative skills and those that have been handed down to me from my family and close friends. I love that I use the old craftsmen skills that are hardly ever seen in industrial goods, those that are sold in large box stores and knock offs that I have even seen  in small Chic boutiques!

When making my items, I use the tried and true way of doing things. Most all of my leather goods are hand sewn using a two needle saddle stitch or decorative stitching. Every stitch is made by me with my needle and thread. There is an old saying that when you hand stitch a leather item, you honor the circle of life.  Every up stitch represents the spirit rising from earth, and every down stitch represents the spirit re-entering earth to complete the circle of life. 

Each item I create has a spirit of its own and will form into a wonderful piece that you will embrace as yours-- each scratch, smudge or spot that is added to the leather over time will blend into a beautiful piece that will tell your story! 

Please check with my store throughout the year for my signed, numbered, items that will be appearing this spring!

Get out and take a walk!  It does wonders!

Treesee

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Toasted Almonds

 Recipe for Toasted Candied Almonds



     In ​​the​​ Central​​ Valley​​ of​​ California during​​ the​​ early ​​fall, you ​​can ​​drive ​​down ​​a​​ country​​ road ​​or highway ​​and ​​see ​​the​​ trees​​ full​​ of​​ nuts; ​​almonds ​​and​​ walnuts​​ are​​ the​​ two​​ most​​ common​​ nuts found ​​in​​ the ​​Central​​ Valley. At ​​this ​​time ​​the​​ harvesters​​ are ​​busy ​​shaking ​​the ​​trees ​​and ​​sweeping​​ up ​​the ​​nuts ​​for ​​harvest. It is ​​the​​ time ​​when ​​all ​​the ​​season’s ​​harvests ​​come ​​together ​​to create​​ some great​​ seasonal baking ​​and​​ goody ​​making.
     My ​​favorite nut ​​for ​​baking​​ is ​​​​walnuts. ​​I ​​love ​​the ​​Black ​​walnuts​​ in ​​cookies, ​​cinnamon​​ rolls, ​​and cakes. ​​The Black walnuts ​​have ​​so ​​much ​​more ​​of ​​a​​ rich ​​flavor ​​than ​​the​​ traditional​​ English ​​walnuts. ​​The English walnuts are the ones that ​​are ​​most ​​available ​​in ​​stores.
     For ​​snacking ​​I ​​prefer ​​Almonds. ​​Pronounced ​​​​Al​​-mond ​​in​​ most all​​ parts ​​of ​​the ​​country​​ except​​ where they ​​are grown. ​​Here ​​in​​ Central ​​California almost ​​all ​​growers ​​here ​​call ​​them​​​​ A-monds, pronouncing​​ the ​​"​​A" as​​ a​​ short​​ vowel​​ sound.​​ They​​ do ​​not ​​pronounce​​ the "​​L​​"in ​​the ​​name. ​​This pronunciation  ​​goes way back ​​to​​ the​​ old-timers ​​who ​​use ​​to​​ say​​ that​​ “​​One ​​has​​ to ​​knock​​ the​​ "L"​​out ​​of​​ them ​​to ​​get​​ them ​​off the ​​tree." ​​​​This​​ funny ​​phrase ​​and​​ pronunciation ​​has ​​lasted​​ throughout ​​the​​ years​​ here​​ in ​​the Central​​ Valley.​​​​ The ​​term​​ comes​​ from ​​in​​ the ​​early ​​days,​when ​​the ​​farmers​​ would​​ have ​​to ​​actually place ​​large ​​canvas ​​cloth​​ around ​​the​​ tree ​​bases ​​and ​​use​​ a​​ large ​​stick​​ that ​​was​​ wrapped ​​with ​​a soft​​ cloth ​​to ​​knock​​ the​​ branches​​ and​​ make ​​the ​​nuts​​ fall​​ to​​ the​​ ground.​​ The​​ farmers would​​ gather ​​the canvases​​ into ​​bundles​​ and ​​carry​​ the​​ nuts ​​to ​​a​​ roller ​​machine ​​that ​​would​​ help ​​shake ​​the ​​outer ​​husk from​​ the​​ nuts, leaving the hard shell and meat inside.
     Now,​​ the ​​new ​​method ​​is ​​a ​​machine ​​called a "Shaker" that ​​is ​​driven​​ into ​​the​​ orchard ​​with ​​an​​ arm ​​that​​ clasps​​ the truck ​​and ​​shakes ​​the​​ tree, ​​allowing ​​the ​​nuts​​ to ​​fall ​​onto ​​the​​ ground. ​​After ​​all​​ the ​​nuts​​ are​​ shaken to ​​the​​ ground, ​​they ​​are ​​then ​​swept ​​up​​ by​​ a ​​"Sweeper".​​ It ​​looks ​​similar ​​to ​​a​​ large ​​lawn ​​mower ​​with a ​​circular ​​brush ​​that​​ sweeps ​​the ​​ground ​​and ​​vacuums​​ up ​​the ​​nuts.​​​​ .
    Now​​ that ​​I​​ have ​​given ​​you​​ a ​​little​​ bit​​ of ​​the ​​fall​​ season ​​in ​​the​​ valley​​ of ​​walnut​​ and ​​almond growers, ​​I​​ will ​​share ​​with​​ you ​​a​​ few ​​old ​​​​recipes ​​that​​ have​​ been ​​shared​​ through ​​the​​ generations of ​​nut​​ growers.
One ​​of​​ the​​ favorite​​ all ​​time ​​recipes ​​in ​​this ​​area​​ is ​​the​​ Candied​​ nut​​-​​you ​​can ​​use ​​this ​​on​​ both​​ the Walnut​​ and​​ Almonds.


    Toasted Cinnamon Almonds

1 egg white
1 tsp vanilla
3 cups of raw almonds
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon

Pre-heat oven to 250 degrees
In a large bowl, whisk egg white and vanilla until fluffy. (appox. 2 min)
Stir in nuts
Mix remaining ingredients and add to the nuts - stir.

Place parchment paper onto a jelly roll pan or other low side pan, spread the nut mixture into the parchment paper the pan.

Bake at 250 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes ( stir part way through the cooking time)
  1st 1/2 hour and again 1/2 hour later -
Cool in pan - when dry, place into jars -


   Sweet Smoked Paprika Almonds   (uses the same directions but seasoning is changed)


1 egg white
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
3 cups of raw almonds
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp smoked sea salt
1/4 tsp onion powder
2 tsp smoked Paprika

Pre-heat oven to 250 degrees
In a large bowl, whisk egg white and vanilla until fluffy. (appox. 2 min)
Stir in nuts
Mix remaining ingredients and add to the nuts - stir.

Place parchment paper onto a jelly roll pan or other low side pan, spread the nut mixture into the parchment paper the pan.

Bake at 250 degrees for 1 hour and 15 minutes ( stir part way through the cooking time)
  1st 1/2 hour and again 1/2 hour later -
Cool in pan - when dry, place into jars -



Saturday, March 25, 2017

Bead Hoarders Bead Soup Blog Party Reveal!!!

Bead Hoarders Bead Soup 

Blog Party Reveal!!!

    I am excited to say it is that time where all the collaborators are sharing their creations from their Bead Hoarder, Beadsoup Party partners!!  I want to thank Lori Anderson for hosting this event - 
    This has been a fun event. You can follow the fun on  Pinterest or on the creator's page for the Bead Party Blog.

   Here is the completed  necklace and earring set that I made from the spring color vintage crystal beads that Lori Schneider / Beadaddicted sent me.   I added a gold tone chain, wire wrapped links, and gold tone earring hooks. The picture does not fully show how beautiful these beads sparkle.  The focal point was made by Marla's Mud.


    Among the other items that Lori sent, was these very detailed poly-clay book beads that she made. After some thought, I decided to make chain link long necklaces with tassels. I used antiqued copper chains and rings. Then added some of my own beads; genuine jade, faux pearls, and a crystal cut iridescent accent bead on the one. 




 Last, but not the least, Lori sent me this beautiful piece of etched copper that she created.  I knew right away what I was going to do with this piece. I love working with metals and leather. So, I created this hair barrette. I cut and stained the leather, punched the appropriate size holes and riveted the barrette bracket, leather and the etched piece together. I feel that the color hues in the metal are accented perfectly with the stain I chose. 



    Lori is the host of the Beadaddicted blog. She is a veteran Beader and has participated in previous Bead Parties.   Here she shares here creations, thoughts, and inspirations. You can find here the beautiful items that she made from the Mother of Pearl shell I sent her and the copper pieces I made.  The Mother of Pearl necklace she made is just outrageous!   A must to see!!  I must say that she has been through a lot this past few months and needs all the prayers she can get. Through all she is going through, she still managed to pull of these fabulous creations!

Thank you Lori!!! 


Don't forget to hop 'till you drop. Check out Beadaddicted blog for all the participates links  

Lori Anderson :: Hostess




Also you can follow me on Pinterest or on Facebook. I will be posting there too!


Thanks for stopping by - see you next time from the top of he hill!